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Venice Update

News of Venice, CA and Marina del Rey CA

Dumping on 3rd, in Venice is Reaching Critical Status

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This is on Rose at 3rd. People meaning well drop boxes of various perishables for the homeless. These are two men with a truck load. Why don’t they take it to St. Joseph’s where they feed the homeless?

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This is on 3rd and what it looks like after awhile.

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This is the Oxford Triangle which infrequently gets piles of stuff. Triangle had about four spots of dumping all in one particular area recently. One apartment lessee left his “stuff” and it took three days for apartment management to clean it up; meanwhile there were a few other sympathetic dumpings and people started to spread the stuff.

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This is the Windward Circle in front of the old post office.

It is illegal to dump. There are fines.

Many “No Dumping” signs are needed for areas such as 3rd Ave and Ocean Front Walk.  Signs will state the Penal Code, the fine. Well intended people, as well as just plane dumpers, are dropping off  “things” and perishables.

The perishables are threatening the health and safety of the homeless and the residents who surround the homeless.  Rats are invading the neighborhoods surrounding 3rd where the dumping of perishables and other material is occurring, according to Rick Swinger who is heading a group to clean up 3rd.

Rats carry many diseases. LA Times has written about MRS, hepatitis, and syphillis outbreaks among the homeless. Neighborhoods full of people surround the homeless encampments.

dump5The City provided close to a dozen trash cans just recently at the request of neighbors. Swinger called these trash cans “rat feeders.” So, the  City lined the new trash cans to see if that would help.

Most neighborhoods have people who clean up graffiti and they are usually the ones who clean up such pockets of dumpings. But 3rd is beyond occasional dumpings. Swinger has a GoFundMe to support his efforts.

Homeless residents on 3rd complain about the dumping. Mr. M, who is homeless, said “people dump all the time and blame us.” Beside him was a roll of unused carpet padding that had been dumped off.

Perhaps, Venice needs a task force to clean up and stop this illegal dumping such as was done in 2014 in other areas of Los Angeles. http://www.dailynews.com/government-and-politics/20141106/los-angeles-to-crack-down-on-illegal-dumping-on-streets-alleys

What the Books Say — Illegal, Fine

Chapter 13 County code for illegal dumping states:

Illegal dumping is the willful throwing, dropping, placing or depositing of a bulky item, hazardous waste or solid waste on public or private property not designated for that dumping or disposal purpose.

City Attorney Mike Feurer says on his website:

Whether it’s toxic waste dumped into a waterway or old furniture cast aside in an alley, illegal dumping blights our neighborhoods and threatens our families’ health and safety.

The County statement regarding dumping states “Illegal dumping activities pose a danger to public health and safety, decrease property values, lower the quality of life, and contribute to urban blight.”
=California Penal Code 374.3  said the fine was $1000 plus and there was a reward of $1000 for one who reported such.  One asks what is a commercial quantity.

A person who places, deposits, or dumps, or causes to be placed, deposited, or dumped, waste matter in violation of this section in commercial quantities shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than six months and by a fine.  The fine is mandatory and shall amount to not less than one thousand dollars ($1,000) nor more than three thousand dollars ($3,000) upon a first conviction, not less than three thousand dollars ($3,000) nor more than six thousand dollars ($6,000) upon a second conviction, and not less than six thousand dollars ($6,000) nor more than ten thousand dollars ($10,000) upon a third or subsequent conviction.

Also, pursuant to Section 117555 of the California health and Safety Code, a person who dumps illegally is punishable by up to six months on jail.

Update knows there is no enforcement of these laws unless there should be a blatant hazardous waste deposited in the middle of Venice.

Sanitation  Removes Bulky Items but is Not Cleaning the Street
Sanitation truck escorted by the police comes every Thursday on 3rd to remove bulky items (LAMC 56.11) that have been collected by residents of 3rd or dumped on 3rd.

In addition the sanitation department is suppose to come once a week to clean up the trash and sanitize certain areas on 3rd. Sometimes they do not come.  City gives valid reason, such as unions, money. But reasons are subjecting  a neighborhood to unhealthy conditions that are out of their control.

Swinger’s web site states:

This year, Bonin voted against additional funds for Operation Health Streets, Clean Streets LA and LAPD Hope to clean up encampments in Venice and Skid Row– which the City Council later approved without him on a 10-0 vote – because it would take money away from services he wants to deliver to homeless encampments.

Due to a chronic lack of clean up and law enforcement in Venice, renters and homeowners who live near the world famous Rose Encampment – who are already dealing with new property taxes under Prop HHH and new sales taxes under Measure H to provide housing and services to the homeless – have been forced to raise money themselves and hire private vendors to clean up the filthy streets and alleys surrounding their homes.

In response to Swinger’s  statement,  spokesperson for Councilman Mike Bonin Jamarah Hayner stated:

For each of the past 3 years, Councilmember Bonin has secured $500,000 annually for Operation Healthy Streets clean-ups in Venice. As a result, Bureau of Sanitation is able to do weekly clean-ups in Venice — one of only two neighborhoods in the entire City of Los Angeles with that level of service. Prior to his taking office, Venice did not have any regularly scheduled clean-ups.

Councilmember Bonin voted against a proposal to augment Operation Healthy Streets by cutting more than $2 million from the City’s budget for homeless shelters, homeless services, and storage. We will never end homelessness and encampments on our sidewalks if we cut programs to reduce homelessness–programs that voters in Venice and Los Angeles have voted overwhelmingly to fund.

Regardless
Regardless,  something needs to be done to stop the dumping in Venice. It is a contributor to an even larger problem that too must be solved.

Westchester/Playa Neighborhood Council Approves Letter Asking for Lane Restoration

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Standing room only inside.

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Line waiting to go in.

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Members of the council preparing to vote.

The Westchester/Playa Neighborhood Council in a specially called meeting voted 15/2/1 in favor of sending a prepared letter to Councilman Mike Bonin asking for the roads to be restored that were removed by the Playa del Rey “Safe Streets” road diet that was initiated a few months ago. An amendment to letter excluded restoration of Pershing Drive.

The eastbound lane of Culver Blvd was restored to two lanes in July. Vista del Mar will be restored to four lanes starting 21 August.

The meeting room was packed with standing room only. There was a line, guarded by the police, waiting to enter.

A statement was made that “Safe Streets” did not go thru the Westchester/Playa Neighborhood Council for vetting and such buffering and vetting was the purpose of the neighborhood councils. Many felt there was insufficient data to justify that lane removal would prevent accidents or be safer…”there just was no data to justify this.”

There was suppose to be 30-, 90-, 120-day reviews and already the 30 is behind. One said it sounded like the normal process for removal, other than the letter to the councilman, would result in the road diet staying for at least two years even if determined that it was not wanted or unnecessary.

A task force of 18 to 20 composed of half “for” and half “against“ the road diet has been formed to investigate and will report to the council. First meet will be Monday.

It was stated that already there have been more accidents encountered recently than without the diet in the same period. Mar Vista residents have reported the same fact for “Great Streets” on Venice Blvd. So streets being safe is questionable.

The speakers were many and varied with their opinions. There were two stacks of written comments–one for and one against. The two-minute verbal comments went from 7 pm to almost 10 pm before the vote. Several brought up lack of data needed to justify closing of the roads.

Only John Russo included extensive research regarding causes of the previous accidents and the lack of justification for safer, calming streets. He made the statement that “none of the accidents that had occurred could have been prevented by slowing the traffic.” Russo has been invited to present his data in the Venice Update. Justification for the road shrinkage was based on providing safer streets and preventing lawsuits such that have occurred. Russo showed that already there were two accidents in June.


It was stated that people had asked for lights in certain areas and crosswalks but never loss of lanes.

Business people spoke and it was disheartening for residents to hear their stories. All the business owners said their businesses were down. One man who ran the shoe store said he had had to lay off one person and was questioning whether he would be able to sustain the business for the rest of the year. It was the same story that the Mar Vista Neighborhood Council heard at their outreach meeting regarding “Great Streets.”

Those who spoke “for” said the environment was better. They had been given notice by the council office. They did not like speeding cars. Their kids could play now.

Countering those who said the environment was better because of slower cars, were those who said the pollution was greater for standing cars. Kids playing, people countered saying that kids should not be playing on those streets that were removed. They are not neighborhood streets. But now commuters divert thru the neighborhood streets where the kids do play creating an unsafe condition for kids and residents.

David Voss, a board member, summed it up for those against the road closures when he said “This is not Vision Zero; this is Zero Vision.”

Summary Conclusion to the letter:

CONCLUSION: There was no sudden need to close down lanes on Pershing and Culver. Indeed, as noted above, the City of Los Angeles identified that these streets are not the priority for attention. The irony is that some of the support for the Road Diet has been from those who want a vital thriving downtown Playa del Rey yet the changes made are having the immediate and opposite effect. The reversal of Vista del Mar lane closures addresses the concerns of the South Bay while leaving your own constituents adversely impacted. However, the cut-through traffic on residential streets because of lane reductions remains a significant and dangerous problem. There is an overwhelming groundswell of opposition to the PDR pilot project as expressed to the NCWP. There is simply no question that the majority of the local community does not like it as it stands and wants the lanes restored without delay. We are confident that you and your staff will respond to our questions and requests and facilitate other City agencies in being timely and responsive. More urgently, we hope that the flexibility you have already shown will be extended to reversing course and improving the planning, evaluation (both pre- and post-intervention), and proactive and transparent communication regarding the PDR Safe Streets initiative. The NCWP and your constituents look forward to collaborating with you in an alternate improved and comprehensive means of addressing safety, efficiency and accessibility other than the current pilot project reduced lanes.

LA Plans to Charge you Big Bucks to Appeal a Project

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NOTE: The source of this is from Coalition to Preserve LA and pertains to council file 09-0969 provided by Marie Hammond.

Councilmember Mitch Englander essentially said in a council meeting on August 8 that the land use appeal fees should be raised to silence the City’s critics. Translation: Homeowners, tenants, homeowner groups, activist and citizens wanting to appeal any land use will pay big time –in fact, be punished!

This proposal is being carried out by Richard Llewellyn, Eric Garcetti’s Mayoral Office attorney, who is currently serving as “Interim CAO” – tracing this fee increase proposal right back to the Mayor himself.

Thanks to Dan Wright, of the famed Robert Silverstein environmental law firm, we have been dutifully informed of the City’s scheming. He reminds us that this harkens right back to 2009, when the City of Los Angeles tried to do the same thing but failed because of swift and fierce citizen action!

Call the following and tell them you are not for this.
MAYOR GARCETTI: 213-978-0600
Councilman Mike Bonin 213-473-7011 or mike.bonin@lacity.org

Westchester/Playa Neighborhood Council to Hold Special Meet Tuesday to Ask Bonin to Reverse Playa “Road Diet”

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Westchester/Playa Neighborhood Council will meet specifically Tuesday (15 August), 6:30 pm at the Westchester Municipal Building Community Room, 7166 Manchester Ave 90045, to discuss a letter written to Councilman Mike Bonin requesting him to reverse all roads on the “road diet.”

Work to revert Vista del Mar back to four lanes from present two will commence 21 August. Eastbound lane of Culver Blvd was changed back to four lanes in July.  A lawsuit was filed by KeepLAMoving last week to put all lanes back to where they were before the “Safe Streets” touted by Councilman Bonin started.

“Safe Streets” or Mobility 2035 is the brain child of Mayor Eric Garcetti.  This year he hired Seleta Reynolds of San Francisco to be program manager of Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) to implement the new street culture. Reynolds, 38,  spent the last three years leading teams in the “Livable Streets” division of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.  She sees LA as “just a much bigger canvas and has so many wider streets.” 

The recent “road diets” on the west side of Los Angeles have left commuters waiting in lines of traffic to get home.  Needless to say, the commuters are mad and want their roads back.  It has been so unpopular that Recallbonin.com was started by Alexis Edelstein.

The six-page letter concludes with this summary statement:

There was no sudden need to close down lanes on Pershing and Culver. Indeed, as noted above, the City of Los Angeles identified that these streets are not the priority for attention. The irony is that some of the support for the Road Diet has been from those who want a vital thriving downtown Playa del Rey yet the changes made are having the immediate and opposite effect. The reversal of Vista del Mar lane closures addresses the concerns of the South Bay while leaving your own constituents adversely impacted. However, the cut-through traffic on residential streets because of lane reductions remains a significant and dangerous problem. There is an overwhelming groundswell of opposition to the PDR pilot project as expressed to the NCWP. There is simply no question that the majority of the local community does not like it as it stands and wants the lanes restored without delay.

We are confident that you and your staff will respond to our questions and requests and facilitate other City agencies in being timely and responsive. More urgently, we hope that the flexibility you have already shown will be extended to reversing course and improving the planning, evaluation (both pre- and post-intervention), and proactive and transparent communication regarding the PDR Safe Streets initiative. The NCWP and your constituents look forward to collaborating with you in an alternate improved and comprehensive means of addressing safety, efficiency and accessibility other than the current pilot project reduced lanes.

 

Doug McIntyre of KABC to Interview Councilman Bonin Tomorrow About “Street Shrinkage”

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Alix Gucovsky and Alexis Edelstein discuss the “Street Shrinkage” and the Recall Bonin movement with broadcaster Doug McIntyre at the Venice Grind last Tuesday.

Doug McIntyre of 790 KABC-AM will be interviewing Councilman Mike Bonan Friday (28 July) sometime between 5 and 10 am about the “street shrinkage” Bonin has initiated and what further street shrinkage is planned for Los Angeles.

Doug McIntyre did his radio broadcast Tuesday at the Venice Grind on Venice Blvd in area of the “Great Streets.” His broadcast was about Venice Blvd “Great Streets” and the Playa del Rey “Safe Streets” and the LA plan for street shrinkage initiated by Mayor Eric Garcetti for all of Los Angeles.

Vista del Mar to be Restored to Four Lanes — Two North, Two South

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Vista del Mar will have its lanes restored; work to start within three weeks. Signal phasing at Culver – Vista del Mar will be changed this weekend. A neighborhood task force will evaluate the restoration of the other lanes that were removed and possible other safety measures that can be initiated.

It appears Supervisor Janice Hahn and Manhattan Beach City Councilmembers Amy Hobath and Richard Montgomery were all in discussions with Councilman Mike Bonin.

LADOT will still be having a Town Hall with Councilman Bonin for residents Saturday (29 July) from 1 to 3 pm at Roski Hall, Loyola Marymount University, regarding “Safe Streets” for Playa del Rey.

The following is the press release from Councilman Mike Bonin.

PLAYA DEL REY – Councilmember Mike Bonin today announced major changes to road safety improvements in Playa del Rey, including restoration of lanes to Vista Del Mar, and formation of task force to evaluate road safety projects in the neighborhood.

Thanks to the assistance of Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn, Bonin said, transportation officials will be able to implement changes to Vista Del Mar that still address the City’s liability issues and maintain coastal access.

Hahn directed the county to make free or affordable parking available at the existing county beach parking lot, allowing the city to remove street parking on Vista Del Mar and restore the roadway to two lanes in either direction. The lane reduction was controversial, sparking outrage from commuters who demanded a different solution.

“I said that I was listening, and that I would eagerly embrace an alternative solution that met the requirements of improving safety and maintaining coastal access,” Bonin said. “Thanks to Janice Hahn, we have that alternative.”

“My constituents were frustrated by the impact this project had on their daily commutes,” said Supervisor Hahn. “I am relieved that we were able to come together and find a solution that restores the lanes and prevents pedestrian accidents.”

Bonin also announced that the Los Angeles Department of Transportation will make changes to the signal phasing and the turn at the intersection Vista Del Mar and Culver Boulevard, allowing for better traffic flow through the intersection, unclogging an area of congestion.

The changes to the signal will happen this weekend. County Public Works and Los Angeles Department of Transportation officials expect that work to restore the lanes should begin within three weeks.

Additionally, Bonin announced formation of a Playa del Rey Road Safety Task Force that will evaluate and make recommendations regarding all of the road safety projects in the area, including those on Culver, Jefferson and Pershing, where lanes have also been reduced. The task force will be composed of neighbors who support the projects, neighbors who oppose the projects, local small business people, and safe streets advocates. It will also welcome the participation of other residents, of commuters, and of agencies or entities that can bring expertise or financial resources to the table — such as the County of Los Angeles and the cities of the South Bay. The task force will be asked to make a report with recommendations on whether to keep, reverse or modify the those projects. They will do so 90 days after the changes are made to Vista Del Mar.

“These projects have been very controversial and divisive for the community, with strong opinions on both sides,” Bonin said. “With the task force, I am confident we will be able to bring all perspectives to the table for a civil conversation and sober analysis, and determine the best path forward.”

The groundwork for both announcements was also laid in part through discussions with Manhattan Beach Councilmembers Amy Howorth and Richard Montgomery, which proved helpful in initiating an ongoing dialogue among South Bay cities and the City of Los Angeles, with the goal of collaborating on a solution.

“We are grateful to Supervisor Hahn for her efforts and applaud Councilmember Bonin for addressing the concerns of the South Bay commuters. It takes a leader to listen to residents and reverse direction when policy doesn’t go as planned,” commented Manhattan Beach Mayor Pro Tem Amy Howorth and Councilmember Richard Montgomery.

In the video (https://youtu.be/YStV2baeYoo) message announcing the changes, Bonin apologized to those impacted by the projects.

“If you are one of the many people who were inconvenienced, who were late to work, or who missed a bedtime story with your toddler, I am truly sorry,’ Bonin said. “We are working to make this right.”

Bonin, a safe streets advocate, also noted that neighborhoods in Los Angeles suffer from an epidemic of auto collisions, and city officials must slow speeds in certain neighborhoods to combat it.

“Speed kills. Public safety has to be the top priority on our roads, and the City cannot shy from that commitment,” he said. Bonin noted that the leading cause of death in Los Angeles County for children under the age of 14 is traffic collisions, and the people most likely to be killed in collisions are children, seniors, pedestrians, and cyclists. He also noted that LAPD Chief Charlie Beck told the City Council earlier this year that the city had seen more traffic fatalities than gang-related homicides.

For more information about the Playa del Rey road safety projects, please visit www.11thdistrict.com.

Venice Blvd Business is Down and Out

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Business income is down and one shop is out of business on Venice Blvd in Mar Vista where the “Great Streets” project was implemented last month.

Sweet Lucie’s just closed.

Demetrius, owner of the Mar Vista, Venice Grind, and MV Grab and Go on Venice Blvd, said his business was down 25 percent. Owner of Robinson Beautilities said his “store has been there for 75 years” and his business was down 40 percent. He has had to let people go. Tattoo parlor said they had been there for 25 years and business was down 30 percent.

Venice Blvd from Beethoven to Inglewood has been billed as the “Great Streets” that will give the effect of a “small town in a big city.” Great Streets is supposed to create the place, the atmosphere that will encourage people to stop and shop.

But it is, along with the road diet occurring in Playa del Rey, part of the bigger picture of Vision Zero and Mobility 2035 that envisions all on bikes or in mass transit by shrinking major corridors in Los Angeles.

Westsider Alix Gucovsky has started the recall of Councilman Mike Bonin movement. See http://www.recallbonin.com/.

Wrede Questions WSJ Author Over Venice Article

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Venice Median project, proposed by Venice Community Housing, is to have 138 units for homeless, 10,000 sq ft of commercial, plus 188 covenant parking spaces.

 

This is Chris Wrede’s letter to Laura Kusisto in response to her article in Wall Street Journal entitled Venice Beach Is a Hot Place to Live, So Why Is Its Housing Supply Shrinking?

By Christian Wrede

Dear Ms. Kusisto:

As a Venice resident who is concerned about the future of his community– for himself and his family — I was hoping you could send me additional information regarding the study The Wall Street Journal apparently commissioned by Issi Romem of BuildZoom in connection with your article “Venice Beach Is a Hot Place to Live, So Why Is its Housing Supply Shrinking.”

I will tell you that as a regular reader of the WSJ, I was struck by the lack of transparency as to the data, methodology and reliability of the study, particularly given the inherently challenging nature of the task you purport to have accomplished — a comparative, nationwide survey of how “tough” it is “building housing” in different neighborhoods (whatever that
means).

In any event, your article made no mention of the fact that Venice is characterized in a Los Angeles Times survey of housing density as “about average for the city of Los Angeles but among the highest densities for the county,”  with 12,000 residents per square mile, at last count — 25% to 33% more than its coastal neighbors to the north and south (Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach, respectively) and 6 to 10 times more than uber-affluent Westside communities like Brentwood, the Pacific Palisades and Bel-Air.

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Venice is one of the most densely populated communities in Los Angeles County. (The dark colors indicate higher population density.)

Similarly, your article makes no mention of the numerous massive apartment buildings either under construction or in the planning stages directly to the south of Venice in Del Rey and Marina del Rey (communities completely intertwined with and functionally indistinguishable from Venice) or the massive strain that new development is placing on our North-South corridors – all three of which
(Pacific, Ocean and Abbot Kinney) are just one lane in each direction.

You also make no mention of the fact that Venice has among the highest ratios of AirBNB units per capita in the nation or the impact that such a large number of short-term rentals has on demand for housing and housing costs.

Finally, your benign characterization of Venice Community Housing’s
development is naive and off the mark.

Becky Dennison applauds herself for limiting the project to  “140
apartments after encountering opposition from local residents.”

But did she tell you that our councilmember, Mike Bonin, originally said
that there would just be “up to 90 small units” on the site?

That the project will occupy almost 3 acres in a community where the
average lot size is just 3,600 sq. ft.?

That she will build not one, but two 3-story parking structures smack
dab in the middle of residential neighborhood?

That there will be more than ten thousand square feet in “social
enterprise space” for businesses now based on Skid Row?

That, by law, no space can be reserved in the project for either
homeless or low income members of the Venice community, and that we
will, in fact, be housing in equal number people from wealthier cities
— including Beverly Hills, Santa Monica and Malibu — that are not
providing any land or funds for the construction of these facilities?

That there will be at least 500 residents?

Or that her project is just one of three projects — ranging from 2 acres to 3.5 acres in size — that Councilmember Bonin has planned in Venice within a mile of one another?

In closing, let me just say I also take issue with the photo of
“graffiti-covered abandoned beachfront houses in Venice Beach,” as if
that is a result of opposition to development. Those houses are as they
are  because they abut one of the largest homeless encampments — in
length, width and number — in the entire world (which Councilmember
Bonin is seeking to grow by spiking funds for clean up and through the delivery of new services including 24/7 bathroom facilities).  Also those houses will be replaced by  a new restaurant that is in the planning process.

I would be so happy to talk with you anytime about what is really
happening in Venice — it is, indeed, a community on the boiling point
— but it would really help the rank-and-file, work-a-day Venice
resident if you would refrain from writing about us in connection with
such contentious issues until you have all the relevant facts.

Third Accident for 16 July Weekend in PDR; Residents Want Lanes Restored

PDR (Photo compliments of Keep PDR Moving.) The Keep PDR Moving website reports on https://www.facebook.com/KeepVDMopen/posts/154099465152908 and stated that this was the third accident for the 16 July weekend.

Playa del Rey residents and users of the roads involved with the “Safe Streets” project that Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) and Councilman Mike Bonin have implemented are not happy and that is an understatement.

Residents and business owners want the lanes restored. Business owners are being hurt financially. No one sees justification for the lane removals. There supposedly are two law suits regarding this.

The PDR Facebook site shows that John and Ken did an onsite show and interviewed locals at The Shack Thursday.

LADOT will be having a Town Hall with Councilman Bonin for residents 29 July from 1 to 3 pm at Roski Hall, Loyola Marymount University, regarding “Safe Streets” for Playa del Rey.

Update has been checking the Culver Blvd westbound traffic at the 90 Freeway each Wednesday at 7 pm.

This photo appeared in Update the last of June.
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This photo in last week’s Update (17 July) shows traffic backed up last week. It was so bad that Alla Road was backed up.
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This photo was taken 19 July at 7 pm. What happened?
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LADOT was called the next day to see if the Culver Blvd westbound land had been restored and they said no. It is not determined what happened. Perhaps, alternate routes have been established.

Bonin Appoints Two More to Chiefs of Staff — Now Four

LOS ANGELES – In a move designed to build on the momentum of his first term, Los Angeles City Councilmember Mike Bonin today announced the promotions of Tricia Keane and David Graham-Caso to each serve as Deputy Chief of Staff.

David and Tricia will succeed Laura McLennan, Bonin’s outgoing deputy chief of staff, who will join the Government Affairs team at Los Angeles World Airports. Along with Chief of Staff Chad Molnar, and District Director Debbie Dyner-Harris, the four will form Bonin’s senior leadership group.

Keane and Graham-Caso have both served on Bonin’s team since his administration began in 2013 – Keane previously led Bonin’s planning and land use team and Graham-Caso has been Bonin’s communications director and environmental policy advisor.