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Venice Update

News of Venice, CA and Marina del Rey CA

Dennison Lists Upcoming Events and Questions Asked Regarding Venice Median

By Becky Dennison, Director of Venice Community Housing

Saturday, March 4th
10 am – 12 pm
Tour of existing Venice Community Housing properties
Meeting place: 720 Rose Avenue, Venice
Please rsvp to Iisha Jones at ijones@vchcorp.org if you plan to attend.

Thursday, March 9th
7:00 pm
Beyond Baroque, 681 Venice Blvd.
Community meeting to present the preliminary proposal(s) for the Venice-Dell-Pacific site!

We are also continuing to attend community meetings as invited – please feel free to invite us to come to any formal or informal group of neighbors or stakeholders.  Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org to extend an invitation and/or give any other suggestions on expanding community engagement or about the project/site overall.

This Week’s Frequently Asked Questions

How Does the County’s Coordinated Entry System (CES) Work?
The CES system created centralized wait lists for permanent supportive housing throughout LA County. Although the CES system is Countywide, the wait lists are regional. This site is in Service Planning Area 5 (SPA 5), and therefore would receive referrals for permanent supportive housing tenants from the SPA 5 wait list, which includes people who are currently without housing and living in Westside communities. CES is not one Countywide wait/referral list.

Is it true that the Venice-Dell-Pacific development won’t provide housing and services for people currently living on the streets in Venice?
No, that is not true. It also is not true that people who are homeless in Venice would not likely qualify for the wait list through the Coordinated Entry System (CES). There are over 500 individuals within SPA 5 CES waiting for a housing referral who are homeless in Venice, and many more are in the family CES system. VCH regularly receives and accepts CES referrals to house individuals and families currently homeless in Venice for our existing housing in Venice and Del Rey, and we plan to utilize the same process for Venice-Dell-Pacific. Additionally, in response to substantial community input regarding the desire to house people already living in Venice, the development team is exploring additional methods we may be able to use in this development to ensure we adequately serve Venice while also meeting fair housing requirements.

Was the development team of Venice Community Housing, Hollywood Community Housing Corp, and Eric Owen Moss Architects selected or approved “behind closed doors”?
No. The City Administrative Officer led the public, competitive process for selecting development teams to explore possible development on City-owned sites. A Request for Qualifications/Proposals (RFQ/P) was released and posted publicly on the City’s website on July 25, 2016. A public pre-submission conference was held on August 9, 2016 and was attended by approximately 100 people. Questions were allowed to be submitted and all Q&A was published online. Proposals were due on September 15, 2016. From the CAO’s public report announcing the results of the RFQ/P, the proposals were reviewed by a Selection Panel: “The five-member Selection Panel for the RFQ/P consisted of four City staff and one non-City staff engaged in housing work. City staff consisted of representatives from the CAO, CLA, HCID, and the Department of City Planning (DCP). The non-City panelist was from the County of Los Angeles Chief Executive Office (County CEO) Homeless Initiative.” The report, with the recommended development teams and the action to enter into Exclusive Negotiating Agreements between the City and the development teams, was considered in four public meetings, all of which had public comment: Joint Municipal Facilities and Homeless Strategy Committees (11/17/16), City Council Homelessness and Poverty Committee (12/7/16), City Council Entertainment and Facilities Committee (12/13/16), and City Council (12/14/16). The testimony at three of four of these public hearings was unanimously in support of the City’s program and the development teams selected; testimony in support and opposition was heard at the Homelessness and Poverty Committees. All public documents and meetings related to the RFQ/P are available here: https://cityclerk.lacity.org/lacityclerkconnect/index.cfm?fa=ccfi.viewrecord&cfnumber=16-0600-S145

Will rehabilitation projects of existing buildings funded by Proposition HHH move faster or cost less than new construction?
Rehabilitation projects funded by Proposition HHH must be substantive, and generally require the same combination of public funds as new construction projects, including tax credits and rental subsidies. Therefore, the development timeline for new construction and rehabilitation projects is generally not substantially different. As answered previously, sometimes rehabilitation projects cost less than new construction and sometimes they do not. Both types of developments are much needed and will be pursued by developers using Proposition HHH funds. However, the City is in a dire shortage of housing units at all low and moderate income levels, so new construction is encouraged and necessary to end homelessness.

All Q&A to date is available here: http://www.vchcorp.org/venice-dell-pacific-faqs/
Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org to submit any new questions.

Venice Vision Does YouTube to Explain Venice Median, Development

Venice Vision is a group of Venetians concerned about the development of the Venice Median Parking Lot — that large piece of land from Pacific to Dell between North and South Venice Blvd. This parcel of land has been considered City surplus  and has been designated for homeless housing.

Venice Vision has devoted a lot of time to bring you a website loaded with facts and articles pertinent to development of  the Venice Median at venicevision.org

The YouTube videos above take one thru this development process and explain what is planned or isn’t planned.   A major concern of the group is the refusal of the Venice Community Housing Corporation to make public their original application to build the housing.  The group claims that never in the history of Venice has there been a project developed this way.

There is a Petition regarding Venice Vision concerns on the website Home page under  “Take Action.”

Dennison Lists Community Events for Next Week Concerning Venice Median

Saturday, February 11th
12 pm – 3 pm
Barbeque/open house and tour of VCH properties – come and meet current VCH tenants and neighbors
650 Westminster Avenue

Sunday, February 19th
12 pm – 3 pm
Flyering, tabling, and Q&A near the Venice-Dell-Pacific lots and surrounding residences
Corner of N. Venice and Pacific, and surrounding streets

Wednesday, February 22nd
1 pm – 2 pm
Tour of mixed use properties, affordable housing and commercial, with Santa Monica Community Corporation
Meeting place: 2209 Main Street, Santa Monica

Thursday, March 9th
7:00 pm
Place TBD
Community meeting to present the preliminary proposal(s) for the Venice-Dell-Pacific site!

“Please feel free to invite us to come to any formal or informal group of neighbors or stakeholders,” wrote Becky Dennison, director of Venice Community Housing. We also will schedule more tours of VCH properties upon request. Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org to extend a request, an invitation and/or give any other suggestions on expanding community engagement or about the project/site overall.

“There were no new questions received this week, but past Q&A is available here:
http://www.vchcorp.org/venice-dell-pacific-faqs/ ”

Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org to submit any new questions.

Dennison Answers More Community Questions Regarding Venice Median

Is there a possibility that there won’t be services provided at this site because Proposition HHH can only fund construction of units, not social services?
No. Proposition HHH creates a dedicated, local source of funds for the capital costs of constructing permanent supportive housing (PSH). PSH is funded by multiple sources, and are blended together to ensure funding for both construction and ongoing staffing needs and services for tenants in the building. Current sources of funding for services in PSH include Los Angeles County, the Home for Good funders collaborative which is led by the United Way, and other public and private sources. Measure H, on LA County’s ballot on March 7th, would increase the resources that LA County has to fund services for homeless and formerly homeless residents.

Why should we spend so much money on constructing new permanent supportive housing?
Multiple studies have shown that the funds spent to create and operate new permanent supportive housing actually save governments money, as it costs more in emergency health care, arrests or jail stays, emergency shelters and other public costs of people remaining homeless. Additionally, there is a severe housing shortage at most all income levels in the City of Los Angeles, especially at the lowest income levels. We can and do provide public funds and social service support for homeless people to move into existing housing, but the housing stock is too limited to be able to house everyone by this method. Even people with Section 8 vouchers have a hard time finding available housing, often facing the expiration of their voucher and remaining homeless. We need to build more homes and use the existing housing stock to address homelessness, and this approach saves Los Angeles money in the long run.

Why not just buy existing run-down apartments or motels and house homeless people there?
Both VCH and HCHC, as well as many other non-profit organizations, can and do renovate apartments and motels to create PSH when the circumstances warrant such an approach, however, there are some practical obstacles to consider. For example, we cannot pay more than fair market value for a property and many owners of multifamily properties and motels are not interested in selling because they either want above market prices today or they want to sell in the future when property values have reached new heights. Secondly, vacancy rates are very low in multifamily properties and it is problematic to displace existing households so that their unit can be renovated and re-rented to a formerly homeless household. Existing buildings will continue to be purchased and renovated by affordable housing developers, but, as stated above, this must happen in conjunction with the development of brand new units in order to address LA’s severe housing shortage.

Can we expect a “Safe Parking” program at the site?
No. Neither HCHC nor VCH offers services to homeless residents at our permanent supportive housing sites – our services onsite are for formerly homeless tenants and other low-income tenants that live in the property. Additionally, the new safe parking program is targeting parking lots that are not in use overnight. This will not be the case at the Venice-Dell-Pacific site if a residential development is achieved.

What was the process for selecting VCH and HCHC to develop this property?
The City Administrative Officer (CAO) released a Request for Qualifications/Proposals (RFP/Q) and VCH and HCHC responded with proposals. From the CAO’s public report, “The five-member Selection Panel for the RFQ/P consisted of four City staff and one non-City staff engaged in housing work. City staff consisted of representatives from the CAO, CLA, HCID, and the Department of City Planning (DCP). The non-City panelist was from the County of Los Angeles Chief Executive Office (County CEO) Homeless Initiative.” The public documents and meetings related to the RFP/Q are available here: https://cityclerk.lacity.org/lacityclerkconnect/index.cfm?fa=ccfi.viewrecord&cfnumber=16-0600-S145

To see past Q&A about Venice-Dell-Pacific, click here: http://www.vchcorp.org/venice-dell-pacific-faqs/

Dennison Lists Latest Community Events

Saturday, February 11th
12 pm – 3 pm
Barbeque/mixer and tour of VCH properties, meet current VCH tenants and neighbors
650 Westminster Avenue

Sunday, February 19th
12 pm – 3 pm
Flyering, tabling, and Q&A near the Venice-Dell-Pacific lots and surrounding residences
Corner of N. Venice and Pacific, and surrounding streets

Wednesday, February 22nd
1 pm – 2 pm
Tour of mixed use properties, affordable housing and commercial, with Santa Monica Community Corporation
Meeting place: 2209 Main Street, Santa Monica

We are continuing to attend community meetings as invited – please feel free to invite us to come to any formal or informal group of neighbors or stakeholders. We also will schedule more tours of VCH properties upon request. Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org to extend a request, an invitation and/or give any other suggestions on expanding community engagement or about the project/site overall.

Dennison Lists Upcoming Events for Community

By Becky Dennison, Director Venice Community Housing

Venice Community Housing, headed by Becky Dennison, lists upcoming community events. These events are to acquaint the Venice community with the projects, tenants that the Venice Community Housing manages in Venice.

Saturday, January 28th — 10 am – 12 pm, Tour of Venice Community Housing properties

Meet at 10 am at 720 Rose Avenue, please rsvp to ijones@vchcorp.org

Saturday, February 11th — 12 pm – 3 pm, Barbeque/mixer and tour of VCH properties, meet current VCH tenants and neighbors, 650 Westminster Avenue

We are still working on the community engagement schedule for February, which will include an event in/near the parking lot as well as at least one meeting to present the overview of our draft project proposal(s) reflecting community input to date.  Both of these meetings/events will occur toward the end of the month, and we will get dates out soon.

Throughout February, we are also continuing to attend community meetings as invited – please feel free to invite us to come to any formal or informal group of neighbors or stakeholders.  Email venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org  to extend an invitation and/or give any other suggestions on expanding community engagement.

More information about the results of community input will be shared next week, and a report of all results to date will be shared along with the draft project proposal(s) at the end of February.

 

Dennison Answers More Questions Posed by Members of Community

The following are the questions Becky Dennison, director of Venice Community Housing, answered this week regarding the Venice Median Parking lot project. These are questions from the community.

What are the specific groups of people that housing units can be legally dedicated for, both in affordable housing and permanent supportive housing?
Permanent supportive housing (PSH) provides affordable housing with wrap around social services to formerly homeless individuals and families. Under current regulations, PSH units can be specifically dedicated for the following groups: chronically homeless people, people with disabilities, people living with HIV/AIDS, people with or families including a person with mental illness, people with chronic health conditions who are high utilizers of the County health system, seniors, Veterans and families.

Note: Chronically homeless refers to individuals or heads of household that have a disabling condition and have been homeless continuously for at least 12 months or on at least four occasions in the last three years, where the combined time of occasions is at least 12 months.

Affordable housing generally serves individuals and families with incomes at or below 60% of the area median income (AMI) for Los Angeles. Under current regulations, affordable housing units can be specifically dedicated for the following groups: extremely low-income households (making up to 30-35% of AMI), very low-income households (making up to 50% of AMI), low-income households (making up to 60% of AMI), seniors, families, and artists.

Will the rents be subsidized at the current market rate in Venice? What are the specific rent and income limits for affordable and permanent supportive housing units?
No, the rents will not be subsidized at the current market rate in Venice. In affordable and permanent supportive housing, there is a rent cap on each unit and an income cap for each tenant of each unit. The maximum rents that can be collected are set Citywide and Countywide by the government funding programs. For example, the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) is a key source of financing for affordable rental housing. Each year a state agency, the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (TCAC), publishes maximum incomes for the residents (income limits) and maximum rents the landlord may charge (rent limits).
Most recent maximum income limits are here: http://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/rentincome/16/income/post20160328.pdf
Most recent maximum rent limits are here: http://www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac/rentincome/16/rent/post20160328.pdf

Will there be on-site property management and/or other staff at the new development?
Yes. California Code of Regulations, Title 25, Section 42 states that if an apartment building has 16 or more units, then a responsible person is required to live on site (usually a highly trained resident-manager). As the number of units increase so do the staffing/residence requirements. Additionally, social service staff work on-site in affordable and permanent supportive housing, as well as maintenance staff and possibly other support staff. The development team will present the proposed staffing as part of the draft project proposal, for both on-site and support staff.

Who funds the supportive services provided in permanent supportive housing?
A large variety of public and private funding sources, including the LA County Departments of Health and Mental Health and private foundations. There is a ballot measure on the March 7th ballot for LA County, Measure H, which would increase the sales tax by ¼ cent to fund services in permanent supportive housing, in order to make the increased development from November’s Measure HHH more successful.

How many units will be rented and how many will be free?
Affordable and permanent supportive housing is planned for this site. All affordable and permanent supportive housing units are rented, none are free.

How many affordable and permanent supportive housing units does Venice Community Housing have in Venice now?
Venice Community Housing owns and operates 93 affordable and permanent supportive housing units in Venice. Of those, 43 are general affordable housing, 42 are permanent supportive housing, and 8 are crisis housing units for homeless families. Venice Community Housing owns and operates an additional 123 affordable and permanent supportive housing units in the Mar Vista and Del Rey communities.

VNC Homeless Committee Passes Three Motions; Dennison Discusses Venice Median

By Angela Mcgregor

Homeless Committee of Venice Neighborhood Council (VNC) passed three motions at their Monday meeting held at the Venice Community Housing office (VCH) on Rose. Becky Dennison, VCH director, gave a talk regarding the Venice Median project.

The 3 motions, all passed unanimously, were:

1. Reduce, Return, Re-house (proposed by Matt Shaw)

Recommendation that the VNC adopt the following principles and aims to support programs that

– REDUCE the number of new homeless people coming here or becoming homeless in Venice
– RETURN those willing and able to go home
– RE-HOUSE with priority (elderly, families, single mothers, veterans, teens, mentally ill)

The idea behind this resolution was to place the Council’s priorities behind programs and organizations that reduce the overall homeless population in Venice. These include the enforcement of laws, the reunification of homeless with family members (where appropriate), discouraging street donations and supporting service donations and supporting local service organizations which enable the un-housed to get off the streets.

2. Motion to allow Section 8 vouchers for rooms in private homes

The Committee recommended to the VNC that it recommend that the city of Los Angeles agree to allow Section 8 vouchers to be used to pay for single rooms in private residences to pre-approved homes to individuals registered in the Coordinated Entry System.

3. Reimbursement to families housing homeless family members.

The Committee recommended that the VNC recommend that the city of Los Angeles agree to create a program and put aside funds pay a set amount of funds to families housing homeless individuals who have been properly registered through the Coordinated Entry System. This was passed as a pilot program specifically focused on homeless in Venice with family members throughout greater Los Angeles.

All three motions were, according to Committee Chair Will Hawkins, aimed at housing currently un-housed members of the Venice community as soon as possible, by focusing on currently available resources. The motions will, he hopes, “start a conversation” at the City Attorney’s office, as did the Committee’s Mobile Storage Proposal. The motions will now be added to the agenda for the VNC’s February meeting.

Following the regular meeting, VCH Becky Dennison and Linda Lucks led a discussion with the committee regarding development of the Venice & Dell lot. Dennison stated that the VCH was open to any and all suggestions for its use, including mixed-use and the inclusion of a community center. Despite prior statements by the Chief Administrative Office that the lot would be zoned R-3 (exclusively high-density residential), she maintained that the zoning for the development is still open for discussion.

Venice Median: VCH Gives Schedule; Answers Questions

 

Next Week’s Community Engagement Dates:

Monday, January 23rd Venice Neighborhood Council, Homeless Committee 6:30 PM at Venice Community Housing, 720 Rose Avenue

*Please note we are on the agenda for this VNC Committee; the meeting will be led by the Committee Chair and conducted via regular neighborhood council rules and protocols

Tuesday, January 24th General Information Session about Affordable Housing Development and the Development Team for Venice-Dell-Pacific 6:30 PM at Venice Community Housing, 720 Rose Avenue

Thursday, January 26th Tour and Discussion with Eric Owen Moss Architects 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm, meet at EOMA Studio, 8557 Higuera St, Culver City, CA and send required RSVP to Joshua Herman at herman@ericowenmoss.com .

Friday, January 27thFlyering and information gathering at Farmer’s Market and in surrounding neighborhoods, 8 am to 11 am and 12:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Saturday, January 28th Tour and Discussion of Venice Community Housing properties 10 am – 12 pm, meet at 720 Rose Avenue, Venice, CA and send required RSVP to Iisha Jones at ijones@vchcorp.org.

Please note we are open to suggestions for additional community engagement activities, and are responsive to all requests or invitations to venues where we can engage with stakeholders about this site and potential development.

Additional Questions and Answers from venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org or other meetings, with additional Q&A added each week:

What social services that you know of will have to be on site for the chronically homeless?  Please be specific.

For developments that serve chronically homeless people, there are generally on-site case managers and a 24-hour crisis response system.  The case managers work with the tenant to identify actions and services that can improve their health, mental health, and address other needs and goals as well as ensure their housing stability.  Depending on the size of a project, or the specific group(s) of people served, there may be other on-site services in order to provide an integrated and accessible service approach for tenants.  Also, the case managers connect people to off-site services they may need such as health care, food assistance, and others.   For the proposed project at Venice-Dell-Pacific, we will create a detailed service plan once the size of the project is determined and the specific groups of people to be housed are identified.  We will share that as part of the project proposal.

Will these services be available to any homeless person in the area regardless of whether they have permanent housing at the site?

Neither HCHC nor VCH offers services to homeless residents at our permanent supportive housing sites – our services onsite are for formerly homeless tenants and other low-income tenants that live in the property.   VCH offers our homeless services at our main site on Rose Avenue and our storage site on the Boardwalk – neither of which are housing sites.   We imagine this property would operate the same way and only offer social services to tenants, not currently homeless residents, though we aren’t yet at the stage of development where all of the uses have been determined.

Who exactly is this housing for?

We are in the process of developing a draft proposal that would include specifics about who will be targeted and/or eligible for the affordable and permanent supportive housing at this site.  Permanent supportive housing tenants must be homeless at the time of lease up, and can include families or individuals, people with a variety of disabilities, people with chronic health conditions, people who are chronically homeless (for more than one year and a disability), Veterans, and some other specific groups.  Affordable housing generally serves people earning between 30% and 60% of the area median income, and can target individuals or families, seniors, lower wage workers, artists, and others.    All residents in affordable and permanent supportive housing are tenants, with legal tenant rights and responsibilities.

Of the existing parking spaces that will remain, what percentage will be used by staff and tenants?

The parking requirement in the City program is that all of the current public parking spots remain open and available to the public.  The development will generate additional parking requirements for residential tenants, staffing, potential commercial uses, or other uses – all of that parking has to be provided in addition to the current public parking.

Will the development generate a profit and/or are there private investors in the project expecting a return on their investment? 

No.  The development team consists of two non-profit affordable housing developers, and this team will develop, own and operate the project under the non-profit model.   There is an initial private investment into most affordable housing developments through a tax credit program.  The tax credit is the immediate return on the investment; there are no additional financial benefits to those investors.

Will the rents be subsidized at the current market rate in Venice? 

No.   In affordable and permanent supportive housing, there is a rent cap on each unit and an income cap for each tenant of each unit.  The maximum rents that can be collected are set Citywide and Countywide by the government funding programs.  For example, the maximum rent that can be collected on a 2-bedroom unit intended to house a family making 50% of the area median income is about $900 – no matter if the unit is built in Venice or in Lancaster.  As another example, the City’s Housing Authority only subsidizes an individual household’s rent for a 1 bedroom unit up to a maximum of $1,300, no matter the neighborhood.   No government funds would be allowed to subsidize rents at anywhere near the current market rent for vacant units in Venice.

Can you provide information for those of us who support the project to be better able to answer questions asked by friend and neighbors?

Yes.  We are trying to do that through our ongoing Q&A responses, and we will be updating written materials people can use on an ongoing basis.  Please feel free to reach out for specific information needed.

Please share the proposal submitted to the City by the VCH-HCHC development team.

We will share the specifics of our original response to the City’s RFP/Q at the same time we present our draft project proposal(s) that are informed by community input.  We are working very hard to ensure that only accurate and up to date information is being circulated so that the community has the information they need and want, and that everyone knows they have time to give input to the draft proposal.  Therefore, we will share our original concept along with our actual draft project proposal in late February.

Is the development team planning to build 200+ units at this site? 

Although community engagement is in process and there is no draft project proposal at this time, it is very unlikely our proposal would include 200+ housing units.   In our preliminary analysis of the land size and other project requirements, as well as adhering to the Venice Specific Plan requirements, this site could accommodate a maximum of 140-150 units.   THIS IS NOT OUR PROPOSAL.  This is the maximum number of units we believe the site could accommodate, which will vary based on unit size, open space, and other variables being considered through community input and ongoing analysis.

Where will beach-goers park?

All existing public parking must be included in any development proposal for this site, so beach-goers will have access to the same number of parking spaces.

Community engagement activities and outcomes to date, as of January 19, 2017:

Activities as of Thursday, January 19th include:

  • 8 small group meetings hosted and attended by Venice residents and/or business owners, with 74 total people participating
  • 1 large group meeting, a visioning workshop, attended by more than 133 people, with over 325 individual comments left in writing directly by attendees or documented by note takers
  • 370 flyers distributed in person at the Farmer’s Market and door-to-door in the immediately surrounding neighborhood, informing people of the potential affordable housing development and inviting them to the visioning workshop
  • 2 tours and discussions of existing affordable and permanent supportive housing in Venice and Mar Vista, with 6 people participating
  • 1 presentation/discussion at a local housing and health coalition, with 38 social service providers, faith leaders and Venice residents participating
  • 3 small group meetings with formerly homeless and other low-income tenants of existing affordable and permanent supportive housing in Venice and Mar Vista, with 25 people participating
  • Establishment of an email update list, with weekly updates sent on the project, with 125 people currently participating
  • Establishment of a dedicated email address for comments and questions, with 16 comments or questions submitted to date

As of Jan 18, we have notified up to 600 people about the potential project and how to contact us to get involved (“up to” 600, because there is some overlap among the activities listed above).  We have received input directly from about 250 people (again, an estimate as there may be some overlap).  We also have more than two weeks of additional activities scheduled for this initial stage of community input.  We are in the process of compiling, organizing, and coding all of the notes and other written comments received, and will provide a full report of the results.  We won’t make any decisions about the draft project proposal until the first round of activities are completed and all of the information is compiled and analyzed.

We have heard the most input and interest in the following categories, each of which will be reported on and reflected in the draft project proposal(s) at the end of February.

  • Density
  • Importance of the Venice Specific Plan
  • Exact number and size of housing units
  • Target groups and affordability levels of all housing units
  • Inclusion of housing for both individuals and families
  • Safety and security of the site
  • Safety and security of the streets, sidewalks and surrounding community
  • Traffic
  • Parking
  • Open space
  • Inclusion for the surrounding community/Shared uses for the site
  • Importance of design and respect for community context
  • Community-based retail and/or micro-enterprise on the site
  • Incorporation of arts and artists

Please continue to weigh in on these or other topics related to the potential development.  We will add categories as needed as we continue to hear input. The development team is working to be expansive and inclusive in our community engagement and hope to build an interactive process for involvement throughout the entire development process.  All suggestions are welcomed.  As always, please send additional ideas, comments, questions and concerns  to venicedellpacific@vchcorp.org.  And have a good weekend!

 

Dennison Adds 24 January to Venice Median Discussion

By Becky Dennison, Director of Venice Community Housing

This email is to announce an additional date for community engagement related to the potential affordable and permanent supportive housing development at the parking lots at Venice-Dell-Pacific.

Next Tuesday, January 24th at 6:30 pm at Venice Community Housing, 720 Rose Avenue in Venice, we will hold an Informational Session to answer community members’ questions about the development team and the process for development at Venice-Dell-Pacific.

Based on input received to date, we understand there is a need for a question and answer session.  We want to be sure that we answer remaining questions to clarify what the process has been to date, the process going forward, and help people get the information they want in order to give meaningful input on any potential project.  Topics could include:

 

  • The characteristics and past experience of the development team
  • Non-profit community development corporations:  What are they and how are they different from for profit developers?
  • The process for the City’s Requests for Proposals/Qualifications in the Affordable Housing Opportunity Sites (the program that approved the Venice-Dell-Pacific site)
  • Details about affordable and permanent supportive housing: Who can be housed?  How is it financed?
  • Information about existing affordable and permanent supportive housing developments in Venice and throughout the City
  • The future public approval process for any proposed development at this site
  • Other questions and topics of interest to attendees

 

Please note that we will not be able to answer questions about what we are proposing to develop on this site, as there is no specific proposal at this point.  As a reminder, the City’s program requires any proposed development to include affordable and permanent supportive housing as well as all existing public parking.  For details beyond that, we are in the process of preparing a draft proposal, based on the results of community input, and plan to have that ready sometime in February.  We will hold additional meetings and informational sessions when there is a specific proposal to consider and provide feedback on.