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Venice Update

News of Venice, CA and Marina del Rey CA

San Clemente Does Simple Homeless Shelter with Tents and Passes Litmus Test of Ninth Circuit

What are other cities doing to provide shelter for the homeless? Here is a synopsis of what San Clemente has done … and it has passed the litmus test of going to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Rather than building a homeless shelter or purchasing pallet shelters and installing them at a location near parks, schools, residences, restaurants, or other businesses, San Clemente provided a small parcel of City property in an industrial area.

They then enacted an ordinance, and issued an emergency declaration, This required all camping to occur at that site. They asked for reasonable requirements, such as registration and check-in protocols, prohibitions on weapons, drugs, alcohol, dangerous tools, fires, or loud music, quiet time enforced from 10pm to 7am. San Clemente later required proof of residency as well.  City provided basic tents and portable toilets but no electrical hookups.

People experiencing homelessness and their advocacy groups sued San Clemente. The judge determined that San Clemente’s conduct complied with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Martin v. City of Boise decision, and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice.  Last month, the plaintiffs in that case abandoned their appeal to the Ninth Circuit, thus acknowledging that their legal challenge to San Clemente’s solution lacked merit.

The following links contain the San Clemente Ordinance and the Emergency Declaration.

https://library.municode.com/ca/san_clemente/codes/code_of_ordinances?nodeId=TIT8HESA_CH8.86CA_8.86.040EN

https://librarystage.municode.com/ca/san_clemente/ordinances/code_of_ordinances?nodeId=959756

LAHSA Gives Covad Stats; Lists Shelter Resources; Americans Making Less Than $75K will Get $1200 Stimulus

As of today (18 April), Public Health has identified 11,391 positive cases of COVID-19 across all areas of LA County, and a total of 495 deaths. 39 people experiencing homelessness have been confirmed positive.

Below is an update on LAHSA’s efforts:

Shelter Expansion
Project Roomkey
As of this morning we have 10 Hotel/Motel sites online totaling 738 beds.
Today, we are expecting to activate another 100 beds across two sites.
This morning our Interim Executive Director, Heidi Marston, appeared on Airtalk to talk about Project Roomkey and the other efforts to protect LA County’s homeless population.

Resources, Policies, Staffing, Supplies, and Support
HUD will be creating a methodology to allocate at least $2 billion in federal ESG funding according to rates of unsheltered homelessness and COVID transmission risk. LAHSA drafted a letter along with LA County, LA City, and United Way suggesting a methodology to HUD that would meet LA’s unique needs.
Last month, Congress approved $1,200 stimulus rebate payments for most Americans earning under $75,000. LAHSA put together a fact sheet to help answer questions and give our service providers tools and information to assist the people we serve to obtain the money they are entitled to.

The U.S. Treasury and IRS have released additional information about Economic Impact Statements:
Working with the Treasury Department, the Internal Revenue Service unveiled the new Get My Payment with features to let taxpayers check on their Economic Impact Payment date and update direct deposit information.

The Internal Revenue Service, working in partnership with the Treasury Department and the Social Security Administration, announced today that recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will automatically receive automatic Economic Impact Payments.

Venice has 49% of CD11 Unsheltered; Count Shows Drop in Sheltered and Increase in Unsheltered

By Darryl DuFay

(23 June 2019) This is about the latest Homeless Street Count for Venice and Council District 11. Venice is one of ten CD11 communities.  The Homeless Count number consists of Sheltered and Unsheltered homeless.  The numbers should be shown separately.

The 2019 Count showed a DROP in sheltered and INCREASE in unsheltered homelessness.  The resulting percentages are startling especially for Venice

                       Sheltered              Unsheltered   
Venice
2018                             121                          854
2019                              10                       1,091
                A decrease of  92%         An increase of 22%
CD 11
 
2018                     141                            1,900
2019                      60                            2,224
               A decrease of 42%         An increase of 15%

IMPACT on Venice
Venice has 49 percent of the UNSHELTERED Homeless in all the ten communities of CD11.

Here is a tally of Venice’s Unsheltered Persons and their locations:

Note:
1.  The LAHSA Count numbers only tabulated three types of Shelters: Emergency Shelters, Transitional Housing, and Safe Havens.  They are supposed to physically visit these locations.

2. What is missing in the Annual Count homeless summary is the existing and planned concentration and impact of City of LA “HHH” homeless projects including “Bridge Housing,” and private investment homeless housing.

What do the terms “sheltered,” “unsheltered” mean in reference to homeless?

Note:  This is a reprint that was published  20 June 2018 when the 2018 homeless count figures were released.  It is reprinted so that once again a reader knows the difference between sheltered and unsheltered.

When one talks about the Homeless Count two words come up–sheltered and unsheltered.  These words are not defined by LAHSA (Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority) within the homeless count.  So what do they mean?  The  Venice Update gave the Homeless Count which showed both sheltered and unsheltered.

LAHSA’s Sean Wright, without a title but works for LAHSA, provided the official terms and the unofficial terminology.

Underlined are the proper definitions LAHSA uses.  The others are definitions more commonly used.

Sheltered: An individual/family living in a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living arrangement.   Homeless living in an emergency shelter, transitional housing, using motel/hotel vouchers, or a safe haven as define by HUD as a form of supportive housing that serves hard-to-reach homeless persons with severe mental illness who come primarily from the street and have been unable or unwilling to participate in housing or supportive services.

Unsheltered: An individual/family whose primary nighttime residence is public/private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.  These are people living on the street or in makeshift shelters (tents, boxes), motorhomes (RV), vans, or cars.