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Venice Update

News of Venice, CA and Marina del Rey CA

Activists Protest the Tabor House Compound Renovation

plaque

Protesters, Venice preservationists, and relatives of Irving Tabor family gathered in front of the  former home of Irving Tabor at 605-607 Westminster Ave Saturday to tell press and other members of the community that they were unhappy with the “redevelopment” occurring on the  property without a California coastal permit.

There were 33 individual permits instead of a redevelopment permit encompassing all the work, which would have required a coastal permit.  Many were also concerned about the historical preservation of the site.    The California Coastal Commission started investigating the project last week.  The following was handed out at the protest.

California Costal Act states: According to sections 13250 and 13253 of Title 14, Division 5.5 California Coastal Commission administrative Regulations, improvements to existing single-family residences or other structures that changes the intensity use of the structure requires a coastal development permit because they involve a risk of adverse environmental effect, adversely affect public access, or involve a change in use.

Irvin Tabor was the personal assistant and friend to Abbot Kinney, the founder of Venice. The plaque tells the story of Tabor and his house and was put there by a former owner. The property had six or eight bungalows and all were occupied by members of his family.

renovation

The above picture is the back of the property. It shows one or two of the bungalows on the left and roof of another dwelling on the right.  A roofing contractor, who was on site, was amazed at the group gathering in the front.  He couldn’t understand the protest.  He said buildings were filled with termites. He noted that it was built in the 20′s.

Sue Kaplan in the video gives more of the history of the house and the neighborhood.

Robin Rudisill, who ran as a candidate for the CD11 council seat, explains that there were 33 separate permits instead of a permit to renovate  the whole project that would  have required a California Coastal development permit.

Comment (1)

  1. Nick Z

    I don’t understand this. They have signs that say “Our history is not for sale!” Well, didn’t the Tabor family sell the property to profit on it? Why can they sell it for money and then family members come back later and want to dictate what can happen to it after they sold it to someone else and banked the money? I must be missing something.

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