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Venice Update

News of Venice, CA and Marina del Rey CA

County, City Puts C3 to Work on 3rd Ave

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By Barbara Osborn, Communications Director for County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl

As part of LA’s unprecedented efforts to expand services and housing for people experiencing homelessness, a recently undertaken and successful pilot program will expand into Venice beginning in October 2016.

The program, known as Venice C3 (County-City-Community Partnership), will focus on men and women in the area around Third Avenue and Rose Avenue in Venice where there is a concentration of individuals living on the sidewalks struggling with housing, mental illness, and substance abuse.

Venice C3 is a partnership between LA City, the County of Los Angeles, the Department of Health Services, the Department of Mental Health, the Department of Public Health, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, Behavioral Health Services and St. Joseph Center.

The C3 model systematically engages people living on the streets; provides immediate access to resources such as interim housing, urgent care, primary care, mental health services and substance use disorder treatment; and helps them regain health and housing stability.

The C3 model is built on an intense three step process: Step One: An outreach team, working five days a week, begins to engage people living on the street. Step Two: As individuals living on the street get to know and build trust with the outreach team, they are assisted in connecting to various services and programs, including substance abuse and/or mental health treatment, detox, or bridge housing as appropriate. Step Three: Individuals are supported to move into permanent housing and linked to ongoing supportive services and treatment.

“I am very grateful that we are able to bring this highly effective, evidence­-based program to Venice,” said Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. “We already know what works in tackling homelessness. Men and women need access to services to help stabilize their lives, and they need a home. That’s what Venice C3 is all about.”

In Year One, the Venice C3 team has set a goal of engaging 300 individuals, or roughly one-third of the men and women who are homeless in Venice, providing services to 150 of them, and securing permanent housing for 75 individuals. These projected goals are based on the success of the initial C3 pilot program.

“The homelessness crisis is the most urgent issue facing our neighborhoods, and the C3 model is a proven solution,” said Councilmember Mike Bonin, who represents Venice. “Working with Supervisor Kuehl’s office and local partners, we are going to make real progress toward the functional end of homelessness in Venice. For too long, Los Angeles has failed to address homelessness, leaving people on the streets and allowing encampments to take over our neighborhoods. Both the people living on the streets and the neighbors who want clean and safe communities deserve and demand a lasting solution to this crisis, which must include housing and services to be effective. This Venice C3 will make life better for everyone in the community and is a big part of the ongoing effort to end homelessness.”

Va Lecia Adams Kellum, President & CEO of St. Joseph Center said, “I have been working in homeless services for more than 20 years, and I have never been more hopeful about our ability to end our homeless crisis. Venice C3 provides exactly the mix of services and housing that we need.”

“Earlier this year, the County and City of Los Angeles adopted unprecedented and comprehensive plans to end homelessness. Venice C3 is exactly the kind of cooperative effort between government and community organizations called for in those plans. Over time, efforts like Venice C3 will dramatically reduce the number of men and women living on the streets,” said Wendy Greuel, Chair of the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) Commission.

Comments (4)

  1. Nick Antonicello

    What happens if HHH fails at the ballot box? How is this 3C program funded?

    What is the plan and timeline to get hundreds of people off the streets?

    • Nick Z

      Hopefully the County will fund it. They are flush with cash and really should be leading the charge on homelessness as it’s in their bailiwick. They have done a terrible job to-date, terrible. Kuehl campaigned on helping the homeless and does practically nothing. Instead, the City has to increase taxes through HHH to make up for the lazy, incompetent County who is using LA taxpayers’ money elsewhere.

  2. heidi

    Street outreach has been successfully implemented by PATH all over Southern California. In fact, it was street outreach that connected those 100+ RVs to housing during Rosendahl’s Streets to Homes program. Many of those people have managed to truly turn their lives around and are still housed to this day. Three things made that program successful: 1) Street Teams who really connected, and 2) HUD vouchers and available apartments so people had a place to go, and 3) Rosendahl’s “carrot and stick” analogy – if you chose not to accept housing, you could not stay on the streets in Venice.

    So really, the idea of this type of service is great news, but it’s only one piece of a three-part puzzle. The county is funding these teams (as I recall, either three or five teams in CD11) and the City is responsible for providing housing for when and if the teams are successful at connecting with the homeless and have motivated them to get off the streets. And lastly, our politicians are responsible for providing the influence so people choose to get off the streets rather than hang on them – that’s the stick part of the whole bargain. Rosendahl made it clear that once housing was provided, people could not stay camping on the streets of Venice. (Rick, here’s your chance to jump in and talk about the unconstitutionality of the whole game. But, the people who moved off the Venice streets through Streets to Homes are doing great by all accounts, so you’ll be talking to my hand for sure ;-)

    To me, this is the first part of a multi-part plan that needs to be implemented completely or it will fail on all levels. A plan that, in its complete incarnation, needs to happen now…not five or ten years from now once some big old developers get all over that HHH cash. There are opportunities – if you think creatively – to house people NOW.

    Sue is right on the mark…we’ll be watching.

    • heidi

      Street outreach has been successfully implemented by PATH all over Southern California. In fact, it was street outreach that connected those 100+ RVs to housing during former Councilman Bill Rosendahl’s Streets to Homes program. Many of those people have managed to turn their lives around and are still housed to this day.

      Three things made that program successful: 1) Street Teams who really connected, and 2) HUD vouchers and available apartments so people had a place to go, and 3) Rosendahl’s “carrot and stick” theory – if one chose to not accept housing, they could not stay on the streets of Venice. 



      So really, the idea of this type of service is great news, but it’s only one piece of a three-part puzzle. The county is funding these teams (as I recall, either three or five teams in CD11) and the City is responsible for providing housing for when and if the teams are successful at connecting with the homeless and motivating them to get off the streets. And lastly, our politicians are responsible for providing the influence so people willingly choose to get off the streets rather than hang on them – that’s the stick part of the whole bargain. Rosendahl made it clear that once housing was provided, people could not stay camping on the streets of Venice. (Rick, here’s your chance to jump in and talk about the unconstitutionality of the whole game. But, the people who moved off the Venice streets through Streets to Homes are doing great by all accounts, so you’ll be talking to my hand for sure ;-)



      To me, this is the first part of a multi-part plan that needs to be implemented completely or it will fail on all levels. A plan that, in its complete incarnation, needs to happen now…not five or ten years from now once some big old developers get all over that HHH cash. There are opportunities – if you think creatively – to house people NOW. 

For example, SHARE in Culver City has 20+ open beds RIGHT NOW. And they can scale up to 1,000 or more as needed, quickly and economically. Hopefully, the C3 outreach teams who will be working out of St. Joseph’s will place people in this housing that is available right now (www.shareselfhelp.org) rather than waiting for years, as has been the case thus far.

      Sue is right on the mark…we’ll be watching.

      

p.s. In response to Rick Garvey – yes, the teams will have Mental Health and are comprised of more members than the Wellers and LAPD, but their stated goals are not nearly as ambitious as what the Wellers and LAPD have been consistently achieving – the Homeless Task Force (Wellers and LAPD teams) have placed nearly 300 people in homes or have reconnected them with families in just 21 months. Compared to the 75 the Venice C3 program aims to achieve, they are doing amazing things with far fewer resources, simply by being creative.

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